Royal Brides and Their Royal Wedding Gowns

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Princess Stephanie of Luxembourg wedding gown

Every bride wants to look, feel and be treated like a princess on their wedding day. It’s just what fairytales have taught us. However, if you try to recall what looking like a princess could mean, you’d probably end up with vague real-life answers. To help jog your memory, here are 5 exemplary royal brides during their royal weddings.

 

Princess Diana

On 29 July, 1981, Lady Diana Spencer and Charles, Prince of Wales got married.  On this historic day, Princess Diana wore an exquisite gown designed by David and Elizabeth Emanuel. Puffed sleeves were featured on the ruffled silk taffeta gown which was decorated with sequins, embroidery, lace and 10,000 small pearls. It was indeed a fairytale wedding and was often referred to as the wedding of the century.

Grace Kelly Wedding GownGrace Kelly

Grace Kelly, the famous American actress from the ‘40s, wed Prince Rainier of Monaco in 1956 in a dress that is an all-time favorite of the people. Gifted by her film studio, MGM, the dress was designed by Helen Rose, who had previously worked with her in the set of two of her films, High Society and The Swan. It took six weeks to produce the iconic wedding grown, with three dozen other seamstresses working together.  The ever-so-popular bodice of the gown was made from a combination of silk net and reassembled rose point lace. The intricate patterns of the lace were brilliantly accentuated using thousands of seed pearls. It is said that the dress cost an astounding £4,500 pounds (£36,000 pounds today) just to make it.

kate middleton in sarah burton wedding gownKate Middleton

On 29th April 2011, 300 million people watched as Prince William, son of Princess Diana, exchanged wedding vows with Catherine Middleton in a grand televised ceremony in Westminster Abbey. Her wedding gown, designed by Sarah Burton from the house of Alexander McQueen, took the world by storm, combining the traditions of English Royalty with a modern day touch.

The bodice which was made from ivory satin was inspired by the Victorian corset, which is also a hallmark of an Alexander McQueen designs. It featured floral motifs cut from lace that were appliquéd on to tulle. Ivory and white Satin Gazar formed the main body that flowed into a long, full skirt with soft pleats. The graceful bridal train measured at just under 3 meters.

As being the wedding dress that caused a sensation worldwide, it even has a Wiki page of its own. Long after the Royal wedding, every woman or designer is still trying to emulate Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge.

Princess Stephanie of Luxembourg

Princess Stephanie of Luxembourg wedding gownWearing an A-line ivory royal gown by Elie Saab, Princess Stephanie wore on April 2012 something truly befitting her royalty. Her timeless, regal gown which featured a boat neck, took 3,900 hours to make, with more than 80% of the time assigned to embroidery for the lace-fitted bodice, sleeves and skirt.  A total of 50,000 pearls were embellished onto the gown and were threaded using ethereal silver. 80,000 transparent crystals were also on the embossed skirt that flowed to the ground. The gown completed with a 13-foot train.

Marie Chantal wedding gownMarie-Chantal

Even as a writer and a luxury children’s wear designer, Marie-Chantal probably still dreamed herself a fairytale wedding at least once in her life. In 1995, wearing a gorgeous ivory silk Valentino gown that took 25 seamstress to work on, she married the Crown Prince Pavlos of Greece and went on to become Princess Marie-Chantal of Greece. The $225,000 gown featured decorations of small flowers onto the lace bodice and appliquéd roses that designed embellish the lower half of the skirt. Her scalloped veil was also embroidered with butterflies and was made from 4.5 meters of Chantilly lace.

Do you wish to emulate any of these royal wedding gowns? TK Designs Atlanta offers custom-made wedding gowns so you can wear a wedding dress of your dreams – at a fraction of the cost.

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